cider and mead questions
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    we are adding content to our cider and mead sections, but some of this relies on whatever questions you might have.
    please, don't hesitate to ask your questions but remember to check back quickly as they will be answered much faster than some other sites.
    please do not hesitate to ask any question you might have. this is a friendly place and any form of ridicule or general unpleasantness directed towards beginners will not be tolerated.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 87,774
    I want to make a simple mead. Like the grapey one you sent me. I already have the recipe, but I am worried about neglecting it. Can I just throw the honey, water, nutrients, and yeast in a carboy and forget about it? Am I going to f it up? My beers tend to get forgotten for a couple extra weeks sometimes in the primary, is this a bog deal with mead?
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679

    I want to make a simple mead. Like the grapey one you sent me. I already have the recipe, but I am worried about neglecting it. Can I just throw the honey, water, nutrients, and yeast in a carboy and forget about it? Am I going to f it up? My beers tend to get forgotten for a couple extra weeks sometimes in the primary, is this a bog deal with mead?



    if its in a glass carboy, i wouldn't leave it for more than 3-4 months without racking, but i know people that have forgotten about it for a year and it tastes good.

    generally just primary it for a month and then rack it and forget it exists until you feel like remembering
  • TomoLiverTomoLiver
    Posts: 1,112
    "Brewed" a cider today.

    5 gallons of apple juice
    2 lbs of brown sugar
    2.5 lbs honey (I'll add this in a couple days)

    Used Wyeast 1099 ale yeast.

    We'll see!
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 120,507
    TomoLiver said:

    "Brewed" a cider today.

    5 gallons of apple juice
    2 lbs of brown sugar
    2.5 lbs honey (I'll add this in a couple days)

    Used Wyeast 1099 ale yeast.

    We'll see!



    ale yeast in cider?! Rebel.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    should be tasty. just remember the egg smell during ferment is normal. egg smell two months after indicates a problem.
    i have made several with brown sugar, but the unfermentables leave a flavor that i don't enjoy, although most people do.

    scoob
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 87,774

    I want to make a simple mead. Like the grapey one you sent me. I already have the recipe, but I am worried about neglecting it. Can I just throw the honey, water, nutrients, and yeast in a carboy and forget about it? Am I going to f it up? My beers tend to get forgotten for a couple extra weeks sometimes in the primary, is this a bog deal with mead?



    if its in a glass carboy, i wouldn't leave it for more than 3-4 months without racking, but i know people that have forgotten about it for a year and it tastes good.

    generally just primary it for a month and then rack it and forget it exists until you feel like remembering


    What's the problem with glass? Light? Or something else? I'll put it in the basement anyway.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    i just like to pull it off the gross lees from the primary fermentation after a month of two. the plastic buckets are permeable so, you really don't want to leave it in a bucket for more than a month.

    the light shouldn't mess it up, i just worry about off flavors from sitting on the gross lees. it can sit on the fine lees for as long as you feel like leaving it. just remember to use vodka in the airlock so junk doesn't grow in there and to check the airlock occasionally and top up as the vodka will evaporate. i check mine every month or so.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 87,774
    Ah ok. Mainly to get it off the lees. I thought that is what you meant.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • TomoLiverTomoLiver
    Posts: 1,112

    should be tasty. just remember the egg smell during ferment is normal. egg smell two months after indicates a problem.
    i have made several with brown sugar, but the unfermentables leave a flavor that i don't enjoy, although most people do.



    Yeah, the first time I did a cider, I used US-05. For some reason I always get the egg smell with that strain. The 1099 is considerably less egg-ish so far.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 53,796
    The egg smell goes away after a while....
    I used Notty for my first Cider...... smelled nasty.... Cider was great...

    scoob
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 53,796
    I typically will not rack a Mead until after 3-months. And will bottle after another 3-months. It's fine sitting on the lees for that long..... but that's pretty close to the limit... The Mead actually doesn't seem to need to age as long after bottling if you leave it on there that long believe it or not....

    scoob
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 53,796
    I use a 6.5 gallon "better bottle" carboy for both Mead and Cider, I like it much better than glass.... well, at least my back does...... I wrap an old towel around it to keep out light.... dang thing is CLEAR....

    scoob
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    I have only made one batch. In primary bucket for 48 days, then in glass for about three months. Turned out good. I am not a mead Master like Fry, but it seems like it worked for me.
  • LothosLothos
    Posts: 2,146
    this is what i use for cider and mead
    just wrap it with a dark towel also
    8 gal brew bucket.jpg
    413 x 480 - 13K
    Ain't that a Bitch
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    All my fermenters are in a basement bathroom with no windows. I check them a few times a week, very little light aside from the occasional light bulb to take a piss. I did move one upstairs in our bedroom, it wore a nice Browning flannel shirt for a few weeks.
  • LothosLothos
    Posts: 2,146
    Benvarine said:

    All my fermenters are in a basement bathroom with no windows. I check them a few times a week, very little light aside from the occasional light bulb to take a piss. I did move one upstairs in our bedroom, it wore a nice Browning flannel shirt for a few weeks.




    LOL THATS FUNNY
    Ain't that a Bitch
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    Still need to make some cider, stupid easy to make, and yet I wait for some reason.
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    entering time now for juice man. get ready. not sure what you're seasons are there for apples though, but in 2-3 weeks, its go time for me.
    thinking about going 100 gallons of cider this year.
    that's right, half my legal limit. worth it.

    scoob
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617

    entering time now for juice man. get ready. not sure what you're seasons are there for apples though, but in 2-3 weeks, its go time for me.
    thinking about going 100 gallons of cider this year.
    that's right, half my legal limit. worth it.


    Wow!

    Could you just ferment it out in big blue food grade 55 gallon barrels?
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    azscoob said:

    entering time now for juice man. get ready. not sure what you're seasons are there for apples though, but in 2-3 weeks, its go time for me.
    thinking about going 100 gallons of cider this year.
    that's right, half my legal limit. worth it.


    Wow!

    Could you just ferment it out in big blue food grade 55 gallon barrels?


    yeah, if you had a good seal on the lid.
    secondary will be a bitch though. but i think i will split it between 7 demijohn's or just buy a SS bright tank.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 87,774

    entering time now for juice man. get ready. not sure what you're seasons are there for apples though, but in 2-3 weeks, its go time for me.
    thinking about going 100 gallons of cider this year.
    that's right, half my legal limit. worth it.


    That's $700 worth of cider in Ohio. On a good day.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    SeaBee said:

    entering time now for juice man. get ready. not sure what you're seasons are there for apples though, but in 2-3 weeks, its go time for me.
    thinking about going 100 gallons of cider this year.
    that's right, half my legal limit. worth it.


    That's $700 worth of cider in Ohio. On a good day.


    A: worth it
    B: 400 bucks tops, in MO
    C: now that i have our other house rented and i am not blowing 1100 bucks a month....i'm rich beaotch!
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 87,774

    SeaBee said:

    entering time now for juice man. get ready. not sure what you're seasons are there for apples though, but in 2-3 weeks, its go time for me.
    thinking about going 100 gallons of cider this year.
    that's right, half my legal limit. worth it.


    That's $700 worth of cider in Ohio. On a good day.


    A: worth it
    B: 400 bucks tops, in MO
    C: now that i have our other house rented and i am not blowing 1100 bucks a month....i'm rich beaotch!

    A: Agreed, once I get better at making better stuff
    B: EAD
    C: I need a rental house!

    scoob
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    SeaBee said:

    SeaBee said:

    entering time now for juice man. get ready. not sure what you're seasons are there for apples though, but in 2-3 weeks, its go time for me.
    thinking about going 100 gallons of cider this year.
    that's right, half my legal limit. worth it.


    That's $700 worth of cider in Ohio. On a good day.


    A: worth it
    B: 400 bucks tops, in MO
    C: now that i have our other house rented and i am not blowing 1100 bucks a month....i'm rich beaotch!

    A: Agreed, once I get better at making better stuff
    B: EAD
    C: I need a rental house!

    Ha!
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • LothosLothos
    Posts: 2,146
    Ha mine is awesome @ 20%
    Ain't that a Bitch
  • jlwjlw
    Posts: 16,454
    I'll be making a trip to the apple orchard here in a few weeks. While there I thought I would pick up some fresh juice and make a cider. I have never made one so I don't know the process. I also don;t really know what the different ciders are. What makes a cider dry? any advice would be helpful.
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    we have a FAQ for that
    http://homebrewforums.net/discussion/69/cider-faq#Item_5
    feel free to post any other questions you have after reading this. Please post as a separate thread so other new folks can easily see the questions
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    Have a cider question, does ABV and original gravity match as they seem to do in a beer, I have found that a wort with an og of 1.060 is going to ferment out to 6% in most cases, 1.075 is 7.5%, etc...does this hold true for cider?
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    no, because cider can end anywhere from .990 to 1.010 depending on the yeast, the conditions of the ferment and even the ripeness of the apples.

    **special note, fruit that is more ripe gives you more flavor, but also more unfermentable sugars. less ripe ferments much cleaner, but provides less flavor.

    this is why overripened grapes are generally used for much sweeter dessert wines. (think late harvest ports, or "ice-wines")

    scoob
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617

    no, because cider can end anywhere from .990 to 1.010 depending on the yeast, the conditions of the ferment and even the ripeness of the apples.

    **special note, fruit that is more ripe gives you more flavor, but also more unfermentable sugars. less ripe ferments much cleaner, but provides less flavor.

    this is why overripened grapes are generally used for much sweeter dessert wines. (think late harvest ports, or "ice-wines")



    Wow! I learned something new today! I was unawares of the ripeness/fermentable sugar relationship
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • morsmors
    Posts: 231
    Nottingham is my favorite yeast to use in cider. I find it retains the best apple flavor in the end product.
    BJCP A0936 National Beer Judge and Mead Judge
    Cicerone Certified Beer Server
    AHA Member
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    HBT "mors"
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    I've started talking with @jeepinjeepin on another thread, but should probably be here.

    Considering a Apfelwine, but maybe use honey instead of dextrose. Ed Worts recipe (google Apfelwine and just about everyone lists this or some version of it).

    Would it technically be a cyser? Recipe calls for 2 lbs of dextrose, what's the equivalent of honey?
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 87,774
    Benvarine said:

    I've started talking with @jeepinjeepin on another thread, but should probably be here.

    Considering a Apfelwine, but maybe use honey instead of dextrose. Ed Worts recipe (google Apfelwine and just about everyone lists this or some version of it).

    Would it technically be a cyser? Recipe calls for 2 lbs of dextrose, what's the equivalent of honey?


    A quick google tells me honey is roughly 42ppg. DME is either 40 or 44 ppg depending on the source and who you ask. According to this I would replace it straight up unless @frydogbrews comes barreling in here and chastises me for being horribly wrong. I've done Edwort's Apfelwein. It's ok. I prefer a graff or cider that leaves a little more apple flavor in the finished product.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    dextrose and honey are pretty much interchangeable in terms of fermentables and "exchange rates" except one offers a little more flavor and body (honey) instead of just booze and a headache.
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    What is a graff?
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,530
    Benvarine said:

    What is a graff?



    cider with some dme or lme added in.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 87,774

    Benvarine said:

    What is a graff?



    cider with some dme or lme added in.

    I guess I should postie my graff recipe. I should also brew it again. It was a hit.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 87,774
    C_dubbs said:

    Benvarine said:

    What is a graff?



    cider with some dme or lme added in.

    I guess I should postie my graff recipe. I should also brew it again. It was a hit.

    Let me clarify. I should "brew" it again.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • morsmors
    Posts: 231
    Graff is a made up malted cider beverage from Stephen King's The Dark Tower series. :D
    BJCP A0936 National Beer Judge and Mead Judge
    Cicerone Certified Beer Server
    AHA Member
    CRAFT Homebrew Club
    Sons of Liberty Homebrew Club
    HBT "mors"
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,530
    mors said:

    Graff is a made up malted cider beverage from Stephen King's The Dark Tower series. :D



    life imitates art.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • jeepinjeepinjeepinjeepin
    Posts: 18,099
    Honey aficionados, white clover honey from SAMs club? Go.
    Sign here______________________________
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    no. never.

    also, its filtered and pasturized, so it's not really honey at all.
  • jeepinjeepinjeepinjeepin
    Posts: 18,099
    I figured. I saw foamy, pollen like stuff at the top. Was hoping for the best.
    Sign here______________________________
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,530

    I figured. I saw foamy, pollen like stuff at the top. Was hoping for the best.



    them's just bubbles. i used this very same honey for my burnt honey experiment. works fine for cooking and things like that.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • jeepinjeepinjeepinjeepin
    Posts: 18,099

    I figured. I saw foamy, pollen like stuff at the top. Was hoping for the best.



    them's just bubbles. i used this very same honey for my burnt honey experiment. works fine for cooking and things like that.


    10-4
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  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    Cider is on my list once I'm relocated, suppose I should read up a bit
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,530
    azscoob said:

    Cider is on my list once I'm relocated, suppose I should read up a bit



    juice, yeast, done.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679

    azscoob said:

    Cider is on my list once I'm relocated, suppose I should read up a bit



    juice, yeast, time, done.


    fixed
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 120,507
    Can I use thyme instead? I have more of that.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    Lakewood said:

    Can I use thyme instead? I have more of that.



    Why not? Give it a whirl, I have added thyme to saisons I've brewed.

    I know you were joking, but really, thyme is a good brewin herb!
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    So I'm 13 days into my first cider. 2 g fresh pressed cider which I did myself, 3 g store bought cider. Two lbs of wildflower honey, the nutrients and such, and two packs of muntons ale yeast. I started at 1.055 and target is 0.99. I'm at 1.004 now and am in a plastic bucket. When would be a good time to rack to a Carboy? Also, do I top up to the neck? If I wanted to do another cider, could I dump cider right on top of the yeast I leave behind?
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 120,507
    Benvarine said:

    So I'm 13 days into my first cider. 2 g fresh pressed cider which I did myself, 3 g store bought cider. Two lbs of wildflower honey, the nutrients and such, and two packs of muntons ale yeast. I started at 1.055 and target is 0.99. I'm at 1.004 now and am in a plastic bucket. When would be a good time to rack to a Carboy? Also, do I top up to the neck? If I wanted to do another cider, could I dump cider right on top of the yeast I leave behind?



    @frydogbrews would be best to answer this. but i would say you are safe to rack, you might want to rouse a bit of the healthy yeast back into suspension before transferring. as for the topping off, i would say yes. you are going to let this stuff hang out in there for a while. You want to minimize any potential for oxidation, so decreasing the surface area to a minimum is the right approach.

    As for the re-pitch, I don't see any reason you could not pitch on top of that cake. at 1.055 OG that first batch didn't even make that yeast break a sweat.

    I now patiently await fry to come in and tell me i've got it all wrong.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 53,796
    What lake said ..... but I would wait a couple more weeks before I racked it
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,530
    might also want to add a little nutrient when you start that second batch. juice has very little for the yeast.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    Don't use the cake because that yeast is not very good for cider. S-05 or S-04 makes far better cider than muntons.

    As far as racking goes, Lake was right, do it now if you want or do it later. I usually ferment to completion, or near enough, then rack off all the gross lees, don't mix it up at all.
    you can easily leave the cider in the bucket for a solid month or two without any fears. Then rack very carefully so you don't get any muck. fresh pressed juice has a whole lot of muck.
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    I actually used Nottingham ale yeast. I tasted and I'm tempted to kill it off and drink it now. It tastes great, a bit sweet still which I like. I anticipated back sweetening at the end. It is not clear, it is cloudy now, but I'm fine with that. I'll probably rack and store for a while. So how is Nottingham in your opinion?
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 120,507
    Benvarine said:

    I actually used Nottingham ale yeast. I tasted and I'm tempted to kill it off and drink it now. It tastes great, a bit sweet still which I like. I anticipated back sweetening at the end. It is not clear, it is cloudy now, but I'm fine with that. I'll probably rack and store for a while. So how is Nottingham in your opinion?



    i think S-04 is similar to Notty, though Notty may attenuate a bit more. Given that, and Fry's prior comment, I'd say you are on the right track.

    you could always put a portion of that batch into smaller vessels, drink the rest and start your next batch!
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    Notty's a fine yeast for cider. I have used it several times.
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    Ok. I bought 5g of apple juice tonight, couldn't find the cider I bought before and the local cider in the grocery had preservatives. No time to head to the orchard so I'm going this route. I also have 2.5 lbs of persimmon pulp. Thoughts on adding this to a cider? In primary?
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 53,796
    Mmmmm persimmons..... pure genius ...

    I would add it after fermentation slows down ... to get more aroma
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    Would you add to secondary then? And rack off those before bottling or kegging?
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 120,507
    Benvarine said:

    Would you add to secondary then? And rack off those before bottling or kegging?



    in beers i always add stuff like that late to the primary, that way i can rack off of it to go to the secondary.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,530
    Let's get this thread moving again. I brewed a batch of cider and just yesterday racked into keg after a decently long primary. It was the first time I've used 'cider' instead of just plain old apple juice. Tasted pretty good, but it's cloudy as old kenny's mind. I might backsweeten just a hair after the cold crash is done. If the haze persists, what's my best option to tackle this hazyness?

    I was thinking gelatin would be the first move, but I'm open to suggestions.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 120,507
    Ive not found any fining agents that are a sure thing. Filtering works but can change flavor. You can rent a plate filter at most homebrew shops
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,530
    Lakewood said:

    Ive not found any fining agents that are a sure thing. Filtering works but can change flavor. You can rent a plate filter at most homebrew shops



    i can't imagine filtering to have a huge impact on cider. there should be far less there to strip out than there is in beer.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 120,507

    Lakewood said:

    Ive not found any fining agents that are a sure thing. Filtering works but can change flavor. You can rent a plate filter at most homebrew shops



    i can't imagine filtering to have a huge impact on cider. there should be far less there to strip out than there is in beer.


    that makes sense, though i dont have any real experience with cider so i can't verify what the impact would be.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 53,796
    Gravity is your friend ... all those solids will just settle out ... with time.
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 53,796
    Rack, and wait for it to clear before bottling
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 53,796
    And... :-w
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,530
    ceannt said:

    Rack, and wait for it to clear before bottling



    bottling? people still do that. :))

    suckers
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 53,796
    Yeah yeah ......
    Anyway ... rack it out of the keg, into a carboy, let it sit. When it clears up, rack it back into a keg, and enjoy your new fangled technology
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 53,796
    Or...... if it tastes fine to you, and your only concern is that it's cloudy ..... drink it out of an opaque mug, so the cloudiness won't offend you
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 87,774
    ceannt said:

    Gravity is your friend ... all those solids will just settle out ... with time.



    Not always.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    As long as the cider was not heat pasturized (which would set the pectin), it will clear naturally. if it was heat pasturized you'll never get the haze out.
    And filters do change the flavor of ciders to a noticable amount.
    Wait 5 months after racking, it should be clear then.
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,530

    As long as the cider was not heat pasturized (which would set the pectin), it will clear naturally. if it was heat pasturized you'll never get the haze out.
    And filters do change the flavor of ciders to a noticable amount.
    Wait 5 months after racking, it should be clear then.



    since this was store bought 'cider' i can only assume it was pasteurized. would pectic enzyme be a waste of time?
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,530
    if yes, then i'll just call it scrumpy and be done with it.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679

    As long as the cider was not heat pasturized (which would set the pectin), it will clear naturally. if it was heat pasturized you'll never get the haze out.
    And filters do change the flavor of ciders to a noticable amount.
    Wait 5 months after racking, it should be clear then.



    since this was store bought 'cider' i can only assume it was pasteurized. would pectic enzyme be a waste of time?


    if store bought, then yeah, call it a scrumpy.
    They actually heat it up in order to fix the pectin on purpose because dummies think "cider" is supposed to be cloudy and otherwise it would all settle out while on the shelf.
    It's quite obvious that we have the technology to preserve apple juice clear simply using vacuum seals and acid, that's why other juice isn't cloudy.
  • morsmors
    Posts: 231
    yes as stated if it was heated the pectin haze is set and you cannot get rid of it. To use pectin enzyme it has to be used prior to fermentation. It doesn't work in the presence of alcohol.
    BJCP A0936 National Beer Judge and Mead Judge
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  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,530
    mors said:

    yes as stated if it was heated the pectin haze is set and you cannot get rid of it. To use pectin enzyme it has to be used prior to fermentation. It doesn't work in the presence of alcohol.



    from what i've read around the internets it will, just not nearly as well.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,530

    As long as the cider was not heat pasturized (which would set the pectin), it will clear naturally. if it was heat pasturized you'll never get the haze out.
    And filters do change the flavor of ciders to a noticable amount.
    Wait 5 months after racking, it should be clear then.



    since this was store bought 'cider' i can only assume it was pasteurized. would pectic enzyme be a waste of time?


    if store bought, then yeah, call it a scrumpy.
    They actually heat it up in order to fix the pectin on purpose because dummies think "cider" is supposed to be cloudy and otherwise it would all settle out while on the shelf.
    It's quite obvious that we have the technology to preserve apple juice clear simply using vacuum seals and acid, that's why other juice isn't cloudy.


    well, done and done. i'll get it carbed and drankin asap.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    I've made a batch with store bought cider, cleared up really well. Racked after primary, and it was pretty clear, then racked to secondary for a few months but it cleared up really fast, I just left it to age, clarity was really quick and nearly brilliant.
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    Not all store bought cider has set pectins though. It depends how it was stabilized.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 87,774
    Is 5 months too long to primary mead?
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    it's on the long side, but not a huge deal as long as you kept the airlock topped up.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 87,774
    Central Ohio in summer. So much moisture the airlock probably has more in it.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
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