harvesting local wild yeast
  • Evan_BEvan_B
    Posts: 312

    Evan_B said:

    Evan_B said:

    The grain that I was hauling the other day is going into a 100% local beer today. The grain was grown, malted, and kilned in NC. The hops were as well. The yeast too was cultured from a local fig tree. It's going to be a saison. I may have access to this yeast later.



    I have been really wanting to try an "all local" beer. I just received my order of rhizomes from arrowhead hops, seem to have some yeast getting busy from my grap vine (though this has not yet been proven), and water is easy. I just need to find a maltster in the area.



    do it yourself!


    I am going to have a little more land to play around on ....
    I kinda like this idea.


    I've planted a 4x4 patch of barley and have been growing hops for a few years now. To make a five gal batch you don't need that much land. Then again I really don't know what I am doing at all. My past malting attempts have been a little funky.
    I've tried some wild yeast harvesting and failed bad.


    I think this is going to be a multi-year project for me. I have rhizomes that I plan to plant in the next few days, so I probably won't get a very large yield in the first year. I have been trying to think about what to do as far as barley seed. Colorado Malting Company sells bags of raw 2-row for planting, but theirs is from Colorado. Would that count as being local if I plant Colorado 2-row in California? Haha. I would like to try and find someone in California that will sell some raw 2-row.


    As far as the yeast goes. Just added the 150ml starter to an additional 700ml of wort, and started up the stir plate. When I was pouring, the smell coming from the initial starter... ohhhh man, "funky" is an understatement. I wish I could attach a smell file to this post.
    Amigo, lay them raises down.
  • Evan_BEvan_B
    Posts: 312
    @frydogbrews

    Thanks for the grape vine bark idea:
    photo (5).JPG
    2048 x 1536 - 1M
    Amigo, lay them raises down.
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,222
    pretty, but how does it taste?
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • Evan_BEvan_B
    Posts: 312

    pretty, but how does it taste?



    It's different, that's for sure.
    It's got that "horse blanket" character as they describe it, but I am also get some citrusy tones and light balsamic vinegar.
    Amigo, lay them raises down.
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    Evan_B said:

    @frydogbrews

    Thanks for the grape vine bark idea:



    since that idea was discovered using a grant from the National Science Foundation.....Thank you.
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 49,222
    Evan_B said:

    pretty, but how does it taste?



    It's different, that's for sure.
    It's got that "horse blanket" character as they describe it, but I am also get some citrusy tones and light balsamic vinegar.


    neat. what are you thinking of brewing with it?
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • Evan_BEvan_B
    Posts: 312

    Evan_B said:

    pretty, but how does it taste?



    It's different, that's for sure.
    It's got that "horse blanket" character as they describe it, but I am also get some citrusy tones and light balsamic vinegar.


    neat. what are you thinking of brewing with it?


    I am unable to brew for a couple months as I work on moving. Once I can brew again I plan on making a bigger batch of a Rye Saison and splitting that up further and try different things. One I am going rack onto mulberries, one will get peppercorns, and I am definitely going to pitch my wild yeast into one.
    Amigo, lay them raises down.