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harvesting local wild yeast
  • Evan_BEvan_B
    Posts: 312
    After doing a little research it seems there are two primary means of capturing wild yeast in your local area: Mixing up some wort, leaving it in a bowl outside for a few days, and then see what you get after a few weeks. The other involves taking fruit (grapes usually), throwing them in a flask or something and wait for the yeast to start fermenting before putting them in a starter. I have a grape vine I planted in my backyard, but I am moving soon, and won't be able to get any grapes before I leave. I do, however, have some small prickly pear fruits hanging out in the back. Could this work as a reasonable substitute?

    Sorry I feel the need to lead into my questions with novellas.

    Any input is greatly appreciated.
    Amigo, lay them raises down.
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 101,154
    I would think any fruit is going to support yeast growth. I have avocados, plum, apricot and peach in my back yard, they all are covered in a nice light coat of white yeast.

    I'd go for it, you'll know pretty quick if its sucessfull.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • Evan_BEvan_B
    Posts: 312
    Thanks.
    Day 1-
    photo.JPG
    2048 x 1536 - 1M
    Amigo, lay them raises down.
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    hmmm....i am very interested in how this turns out. a great deal of the sugars in the fruit of a prickly pear are unfermentable, simply due to the age of the fruits (as sugar ages, it becomes more and more unfermentable)

    this may have a very selective variety of yeast surviving on it.
    I have a researcher that cultures yeast of small bark samples from trees and grape vines. pull off some bark from your grapevine, toss it is a sugary substrate, carry on. This is just another option if you want to do it. you don't need to wait for fruit at all.
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 46,129
    i'd suggest a hefe or farmhouse style ale if you can culture up a viable sample. wild yeasts tend to have poor flocculation and leave some 'yeasty' flavors. perfect for those two styles.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 46,129
    i always wanted to try and grab a wild yeast via the wort in a jar method in the woods near my grandmothers house. the forests there smell incredible in the summer. i would love to get some of that deep forest/earthy mustiness in an ale.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 101,154
    Evan_B said:

    Thanks.
    Day 1-



    Personally, I would just take the skin of a couple of those and drop them into about 100ml of wort.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • Evan_BEvan_B
    Posts: 312

    hmmm....i am very interested in how this turns out. a great deal of the sugars in the fruit of a prickly pear are unfermentable, simply due to the age of the fruits (as sugar ages, it becomes more and more unfermentable)

    this may have a very selective variety of yeast surviving on it.
    I have a researcher that cultures yeast of small bark samples from trees and grape vines. pull off some bark from your grapevine, toss it is a sugary substrate, carry on. This is just another option if you want to do it. you don't need to wait for fruit at all.



    I am going to try the grapevine bark idea tomorrow or the day after. Thanks.


    i'd suggest a hefe or farmhouse style ale if you can culture up a viable sample. wild yeasts tend to have poor flocculation and leave some 'yeasty' flavors. perfect for those two styles.



    The weather is starting to warm up too!!!
    Unfortunately I am going to have to wait a few weeks to brew anything while I pack up my stuff and move.
    I think as soon as I am back in the saddle I will have to try a saison experiment with different wild yeast captured from different surroundings/fruits.

    Amigo, lay them raises down.
  • Evan_BEvan_B
    Posts: 312
    Lakewood said:

    Evan_B said:

    Thanks.
    Day 1-



    Personally, I would just take the skin of a couple of those and drop them into about 100ml of wort.


    I am not lacking in the availability of cactus fruit. If this initial test doesn't work then I will definitely be adding some more to wort.
    Amigo, lay them raises down.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 47,487
    Somebody I know that cultures yeast all the time told me to never let wort set out for longer than three days
    In wine there is wisdom.
    In beer there is freedom.
    In water there is bacteria.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 47,487
    He says you run the risk of getting "bad stuff" in there
    In wine there is wisdom.
    In beer there is freedom.
    In water there is bacteria.
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 101,154
    makes sense. if you let a finished beer sit out open for long enough it will turn nasty.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • jeepinjeepinjeepinjeepin
    Posts: 16,629
    The grain that I was hauling the other day is going into a 100% local beer today. The grain was grown, malted, and kilned in NC. The hops were as well. The yeast too was cultured from a local fig tree. It's going to be a saison. I may have access to this yeast later.

    If I'm not mistaken this yeast was collected in wort under the tree overnight. They also have another culture from the skin of the fruit. It must be awesome having a contact that can sequence yeast DNA and tell you exactly what you have. I just want a decent microscope to monitor for bacteria and yeast health.
    Sign here______________________________
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 47,487
    That
    is
    freaking
    cool
    In wine there is wisdom.
    In beer there is freedom.
    In water there is bacteria.
  • jeepinjeepinjeepinjeepin
    Posts: 16,629
    Sign here______________________________
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 47,487
    I want some!
    In wine there is wisdom.
    In beer there is freedom.
    In water there is bacteria.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 47,487
    (While it was loading I thought to myself .... I can't believe I just clicked on that!)
    In wine there is wisdom.
    In beer there is freedom.
    In water there is bacteria.
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 101,154
    awesome
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 46,129

    I just want a decent microscope to monitor for bacteria and yeast health.



    this. twice.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • Evan_BEvan_B
    Posts: 312
    The prickly pear proved to be fruitless (pun not intended). Call me impatient, but after two days and no signs of anything I chucked it. However, I did also take some bark from my grape vine and just threw it in some ~1.040 wort (150ml).

    Hot Diggity!!!!!! One day later
    photo (1).JPG
    2048 x 1536 - 1M
    Amigo, lay them raises down.
  • Evan_BEvan_B
    Posts: 312

    The grain that I was hauling the other day is going into a 100% local beer today. The grain was grown, malted, and kilned in NC. The hops were as well. The yeast too was cultured from a local fig tree. It's going to be a saison. I may have access to this yeast later.



    I have been really wanting to try an "all local" beer. I just received my order of rhizomes from arrowhead hops, seem to have some yeast getting busy from my grap vine (though this has not yet been proven), and water is easy. I just need to find a maltster in the area.

    Amigo, lay them raises down.
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 101,154
    Evan_B said:

    The prickly pear proved to be fruitless (pun not intended). Call me impatient, but after two days and no signs of anything I chucked it. However, I did also take some bark from my grape vine and just threw it in some ~1.040 wort (150ml).

    Hot Diggity!!!!!! One day later



    good deal!
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 46,129
    Evan_B said:

    The grain that I was hauling the other day is going into a 100% local beer today. The grain was grown, malted, and kilned in NC. The hops were as well. The yeast too was cultured from a local fig tree. It's going to be a saison. I may have access to this yeast later.



    I have been really wanting to try an "all local" beer. I just received my order of rhizomes from arrowhead hops, seem to have some yeast getting busy from my grap vine (though this has not yet been proven), and water is easy. I just need to find a maltster in the area.



    do it yourself!
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • Evan_BEvan_B
    Posts: 312

    Evan_B said:

    The grain that I was hauling the other day is going into a 100% local beer today. The grain was grown, malted, and kilned in NC. The hops were as well. The yeast too was cultured from a local fig tree. It's going to be a saison. I may have access to this yeast later.



    I have been really wanting to try an "all local" beer. I just received my order of rhizomes from arrowhead hops, seem to have some yeast getting busy from my grap vine (though this has not yet been proven), and water is easy. I just need to find a maltster in the area.



    do it yourself!


    I am going to have a little more land to play around on ....
    I kinda like this idea.
    Amigo, lay them raises down.
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 72,728
    Evan_B said:

    Evan_B said:

    The grain that I was hauling the other day is going into a 100% local beer today. The grain was grown, malted, and kilned in NC. The hops were as well. The yeast too was cultured from a local fig tree. It's going to be a saison. I may have access to this yeast later.



    I have been really wanting to try an "all local" beer. I just received my order of rhizomes from arrowhead hops, seem to have some yeast getting busy from my grap vine (though this has not yet been proven), and water is easy. I just need to find a maltster in the area.



    do it yourself!


    I am going to have a little more land to play around on ....
    I kinda like this idea.


    I've planted a 4x4 patch of barley and have been growing hops for a few years now. To make a five gal batch you don't need that much land. Then again I really don't know what I am doing at all. My past malting attempts have been a little funky.
    I've tried some wild yeast harvesting and failed bad.
    "I'm going to guess that you are, indeed, fucked up."
    CurlyFat's 59,000th post
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 46,129

    Evan_B said:

    Evan_B said:

    The grain that I was hauling the other day is going into a 100% local beer today. The grain was grown, malted, and kilned in NC. The hops were as well. The yeast too was cultured from a local fig tree. It's going to be a saison. I may have access to this yeast later.



    I have been really wanting to try an "all local" beer. I just received my order of rhizomes from arrowhead hops, seem to have some yeast getting busy from my grap vine (though this has not yet been proven), and water is easy. I just need to find a maltster in the area.



    do it yourself!


    I am going to have a little more land to play around on ....
    I kinda like this idea.


    I've planted a 4x4 patch of barley and have been growing hops for a few years now. To make a five gal batch you don't need that much land. Then again I really don't know what I am doing at all. My past malting attempts have been a little funky.
    I've tried some wild yeast harvesting and failed bad.


    speaking of, how is your basement lab going?

    @Dr_Jerryrigger
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B