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spent grain bread
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    Last night i made some spent grain bread using a mixture of the black patent malt and chocolate malt from my recent black ipa.
    turned out pretty good, turned the bread pretty dark, like a rye. added extra honey to counteract the expected bitterness from those grains in this application. worked pretty well

    5 cups bread flour
    1 cup spent grain (combo choc. and black)
    1 tbs yeast
    1.75 cups water
    3 tbs honey
    1 tbs brown sugar
    2tbs salt

    take .75 cups warm water and mix with 1 tbs honey. bloom the yeast in there for ten minutes. then mix everything together and knead for ten minutes (dough hook in kitchen aid is what i use)

    place in oiled bowl until it doubles in size, anywhere from 1 hour to 5 hours depending on conditions

    remove from bowl and knead again, by hand, for a few minutes. smash down and fold in thirds, smash some more, you are trying to make the yeast homogenous throughout the mixture.

    put into whatever shapes you want and cover with a damp rag, let rise another 30-45 minutes.

    make a 1/4" slit down the middle with a small serrated knife.

    put into fully heated up, 425 degree oven.

    cooking time depends entirely on the shape you chose. ~20 minutes for baguettes, an hour maybe if put into a loaf pan.

    remove from oven when internal temp is 200 degrees

    let stand on a rack for a half hour before cutting into it

    KegOutlet
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 46,890
    pics or it didn't happen.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 48,486
    So..... how did it turn out?
    In wine there is wisdom.
    In beer there is freedom.
    In water there is bacteria.
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    oh, forgot that part didn't i.....

    took longer to rise initially than any other bread i have made, flavor is good, kinda roasty and sweet, much like a rye or something like that.

    i'm make it again.
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    I make a lot of spent grain bread, always turns out rather dense, great for breakfast toasted, I need to work on a fluffier version, how is yours? Really dense or no?
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    not really dense at all, i would say slightly dense.
    i don't like those dense breads either that seem to weigh 10 pounds!

    the trick i have learned to this is to really knead it hard after the initial rise. it spreads all the longer gluten bits around and lets it rise higher. if it still comes out too dense, add 1/2 cup vital wheat gluten when mixing all the flour and stuff together, that makes it nice and fluffy.

    also, make sure that first rise is complete, fully doubles in volume. some of the dense breads i have made were because i was impatient for that first rise. sometimes it takes 4-5 hours, although that long is rare here.
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617

    not really dense at all, i would say slightly dense.
    i don't like those dense breads either that seem to weigh 10 pounds!

    the trick i have learned to this is to really knead it hard after the initial rise. it spreads all the longer gluten bits around and lets it rise higher. if it still comes out too dense, add 1/2 cup vital wheat gluten when mixing all the flour and stuff together, that makes it nice and fluffy.

    also, make sure that first rise is complete, fully doubles in volume. some of the dense breads i have made were because i was impatient for that first rise. sometimes it takes 4-5 hours, although that long is rare here.



    I have a hard time keeping the dough moist with the low humidity, things dry out quickly here
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 103,796
    azscoob said:

    not really dense at all, i would say slightly dense.
    i don't like those dense breads either that seem to weigh 10 pounds!

    the trick i have learned to this is to really knead it hard after the initial rise. it spreads all the longer gluten bits around and lets it rise higher. if it still comes out too dense, add 1/2 cup vital wheat gluten when mixing all the flour and stuff together, that makes it nice and fluffy.

    also, make sure that first rise is complete, fully doubles in volume. some of the dense breads i have made were because i was impatient for that first rise. sometimes it takes 4-5 hours, although that long is rare here.



    I have a hard time keeping the dough moist with the low humidity, things dry out quickly here


    Cover the bowl with a moist towel.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    Lakewood said:

    azscoob said:

    not really dense at all, i would say slightly dense.
    i don't like those dense breads either that seem to weigh 10 pounds!

    the trick i have learned to this is to really knead it hard after the initial rise. it spreads all the longer gluten bits around and lets it rise higher. if it still comes out too dense, add 1/2 cup vital wheat gluten when mixing all the flour and stuff together, that makes it nice and fluffy.

    also, make sure that first rise is complete, fully doubles in volume. some of the dense breads i have made were because i was impatient for that first rise. sometimes it takes 4-5 hours, although that long is rare here.



    I have a hard time keeping the dough moist with the low humidity, things dry out quickly here


    Cover the bowl with a moist towel.


    It dries out in like 15 minutes if it isnt really soaked. , I have good luck with a combo of a damp towel and then cover it with a plastic trash bag
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    Bread is a tough thing for me to master, I can make great focaccia dough, but it is a different recipe entirely.
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    i love focaccia, but the wife handles making that. i do all the bread that really needs a knead.

    i have heard keeping dough from drying out in that area was a real challenge. although, if you have a ferm chamber already, just toss a small humidifier in there and it becomes a proofing chamber.
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617

    i love focaccia, but the wife handles making that. i do all the bread that really needs a knead.

    i have heard keeping dough from drying out in that area was a real challenge. although, if you have a ferm chamber already, just toss a small humidifier in there and it becomes a proofing chamber.



    What should I set the temp to? And how humid? I have a couple ultrasonic disc humidifiers that I use for fog effects in the bar at Halloween, would that be too much?
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    no that would be fine. temp would be around 70.

    you just want it humid enough to not dry out the towel. you would still want it covered with a towel.

    first rise, for me i always cover tightly with saran wrap, so humidity(or lack of) shouldn't matter then, its the second rise that needs the moist towel. that rise can take 20 minutes to an hour.
  • I'm going to have to try this sometime.... considering you only used 1 cup, you could probably open up a spent grain bakery!

    Any other recipes or uses for spent grain out there?
  • @frydogbrews - and how about sharing that Black IPA recipe? I just had one get overactive and blow its airlock, so I'm going to be starting a new one soon.
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    i will put up the recipe once i taste it and determine if its any good; which will be another two weeks or so.

    i put another recipe up for spent grain pizza dough that turned out really good.
    i've also put spent grain in hearty soups and frittata's with good result.
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 46,890
    KegOutlet said:

    I'm going to have to try this sometime.... considering you only used 1 cup, you could probably open up a spent grain bakery!

    Any other recipes or uses for spent grain out there?



    @kegoutlet, here you go:

    http://homebrewforums.net/discussion/576/cheddar-and-poblano-drop-biscuits
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B