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Quick disconnects....
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,201
    I'm working on my pseudo single tier... Bottom line is I want to use one pump for multiple uses. The easiest way for me to accomplish this is QDs on the vessel outlets that match a QD on the pump inlet supply hose. I like SS camlocks, because they're blingin', but what about these? Is there a reason not to? I mean, that's crazy cheap!
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 99,240 Accepted Answer
    the only real drawback i can see to plastic is that they can be damaged/deformed more easily than metal, so they are more likely to leak after several mate-demate cycles. But for that price just buy a few extra male and female fittings and keep them on hand so if you get a bad seal you can swap out the bad part and be back up and running in few minutes.

    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    I saw these in use at a nano brewery I hung with one weekend. Seemed nice. http://morebeer.com/search/102358///Stainless_Clover_Fittings.
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    I use polysulfone couplers and have for some time, never had so much as a hiccup with using them, and I like that being non metal I can actually touch them without burning my hand.

    As for heat resistance, I have one on the stainless ball valve on my keggle, brewed lots of batches without any deformation at all, easy to use as well.

    They look like this:
    http://www.brewmasterswarehouse.com/product/0101730/polysulfone-disconnects-38-barb-female
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,201
    Scoob, do you know what the ID of that fitting is? The one you use?

    scoob
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    CB said:

    Scoob, do you know what the ID of that fitting is? The one you use?



    The true ID of the barb and the opening? I will check here after breakfast
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,201
    azscoob said:

    CB said:

    Scoob, do you know what the ID of that fitting is? The one you use?



    The true ID of the barb and the opening? I will check here after breakfast


    Correct. I've read that flow restriction can cause a problem on the input side. But there are a ton of people using stuff like this on the input side of the pump. I'm just trying to figure out if it's a problem I care about right now.

    scoob
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    CB said:

    azscoob said:

    CB said:

    Scoob, do you know what the ID of that fitting is? The one you use?



    The true ID of the barb and the opening? I will check here after breakfast


    Correct. I've read that flow restriction can cause a problem on the input side. But there are a ton of people using stuff like this on the input side of the pump. I'm just trying to figure out if it's a problem I care about right now.


    Mine work great on the inlet side, everything is 1/2" stuff, I have to measure tomorrow because my calipers are at work.

    I don't have the valves ones that stop flow when disconnected, they are the open flow style
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,201
    Most of the barbs I've seen reduce down to an actual ID of ~.38". The only way to really get a true .5" throughout is to go with camlocks and use the 5/8" threaded barb for all hose. Given the common use of these fittings on home brew rigs I doubt it's an issue, but I'm still curious.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    Are you concerned about flow? I have no issues whatsoever in regards to flow, it takes a couple minutes to completely drain my kettle. I have long puzzled over the concern of pump fitting flow rates and diameter. Is it a worry of pump lift? Or is it the volume of flow?
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 99,240
    azscoob said:

    Are you concerned about flow? I have no issues whatsoever in regards to flow, it takes a couple minutes to completely drain my kettle. I have long puzzled over the concern of pump fitting flow rates and diameter. Is it a worry of pump lift? Or is it the volume of flow?



    The issue is cavitation. Flow restriction on the inlet side creat a pressure drop. At room temperature this has little effect on anything, but when the wort is only a couple degrees below boiling the pressure drop can result in the wort boiling inside the impeller, and thus just vapor locking.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,201
    azscoob said:

    Are you concerned about flow? I have no issues whatsoever in regards to flow, it takes a couple minutes to completely drain my kettle. I have long puzzled over the concern of pump fitting flow rates and diameter. Is it a worry of pump lift? Or is it the volume of flow?


    I've just read about problems in general. I just asking. I'll buy the cheap ones in the OP most likely. Eventually I'll go to camlocks with 5/8" barbs anyway. Cuz they're Bling-bling. If you don't have issues, I'm not worried about it.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,201
    Lakewood said:

    azscoob said:

    Are you concerned about flow? I have no issues whatsoever in regards to flow, it takes a couple minutes to completely drain my kettle. I have long puzzled over the concern of pump fitting flow rates and diameter. Is it a worry of pump lift? Or is it the volume of flow?



    The issue is cavitation. Flow restriction on the inlet side creat a pressure drop. At room temperature this has little effect on anything, but when the wort is only a couple degrees below boiling the pressure drop can result in the wort boiling inside the impeller, and thus just vapor locking.


    You recirc at the end of boil to sanitize the pump and lines the recirc to chill, right? Even as I ask this I think I recall you said your rig is hard plumbed...
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 99,240
    CB said:

    Lakewood said:

    azscoob said:

    Are you concerned about flow? I have no issues whatsoever in regards to flow, it takes a couple minutes to completely drain my kettle. I have long puzzled over the concern of pump fitting flow rates and diameter. Is it a worry of pump lift? Or is it the volume of flow?



    The issue is cavitation. Flow restriction on the inlet side creat a pressure drop. At room temperature this has little effect on anything, but when the wort is only a couple degrees below boiling the pressure drop can result in the wort boiling inside the impeller, and thus just vapor locking.


    You recirc at the end of boil to sanitize the pump and lines the recirc to chill, right? Even as I ask this I think I recall you said your rig is hard plumbed...


    yes, and i have this problem once i get above about 200 degrees.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    Hmm, I only get air in the system when I try to recirc a full rolling boil, my pickup is off to one side along the bottom to avoid the trub cone, but it does face downward to pull as much as I can out when draining.

    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    I measured the inside of one of my barbed fittings, .382"
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 99,240
    azscoob said:

    Hmm, I only get air in the system when I try to recirc a full rolling boil, my pickup is off to one side along the bottom to avoid the trub cone, but it does face downward to pull as much as I can out when draining.



    Not sure of your rig configuration, but mounting the pump as low as possible helps a lot, the head pressure from gravity can help offset the dynamic pressure reduction. Mine is mounted too high, just a couple inches below the bottom of the kettles.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    Mine is 2 feet below the kettle
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 99,240
    azscoob said:

    Mine is 2 feet below the kettle



    i figured that was the case. 24 inches of head should be sufficient to counteract the pressure drop
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • scoobscoob
    Posts: 16,617
    24 inches of head is always a good thing
    Jesus didn't wear pants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 99,240
    :-j
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 45,611
    Resurrection!!!!!!1 @c-block did you buy the Kent disconnects? I think I want some.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,201
    I did! And never installed them!
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 45,611
    C_B said:

    I did! And never installed them!



    nice. so they work perfectly...
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 99,240

    C_B said:

    I did! And never installed them!



    nice. so they work perfectly...


    It's hard to give a bad review...
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,201

    C_B said:

    I did! And never installed them!



    nice. so they work perfectly...

    I certainly haven't had any trouble out of them.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants