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Vienna lager
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 46,995
    I came up with this beer as an attempt to create a mexican style vienna lager (dos equis ambar, negra modelo) but it came out decidedly german tasting and delicious. I've gotten very positive remarks from craft beer enthusiasts as well as folks that have little experience with non-bmc.

    7.25# german vienna
    1# flaked corn
    .5 home caramelized munich
    .25# C40L
    .25# C60L

    1 oz perle (8.2%) @ 60 min.

    og-1.049
    fg-1.009

    Ibu-25.5

    Saflager 34/70

    Three weeks @53F-ish. lagered at 35F for three weeks

    The key to the tastiness is in the home made caramunich. I based the process off a site that outlined roasting malts. They made a convenient version 2 that describes what I did (about halfway down the page): http://barleypopmaker.info/tag/home-roasting-malts/

    If you don't want to go through the trouble of all that, use caramunich III and add 3 oz of black patent late in the mash.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • BenSBenS
    Posts: 6,248
    Awesome. I love me a Vienna lager. Actually I love all type of German lagers. I think the home roasted malt in there is a nice touch.
    There's no starting point. It's just a massive sea of shit to wade through until you find the occasional corn kernel. -DrCurly
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 105,031
    just a thought, but i would guess that using the imported grains is the primary reason you didn't get the Mexican lager flavor you were looking for. I think focusing on north american grains would get you closer.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 46,995
    Lakewood said:

    just a thought, but i would guess that using the imported grains is the primary reason you didn't get the Mexican lager flavor you were looking for. I think focusing on north american grains would get you closer.



    i'd have to double the corn and lower my mash temps to get it more like a mexican style. i might try it in the future, but i'm happy with how it tastes as is.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B