bourbon suggestions
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 48,594
    I'm not a booze drinker, so my experience is limited, but I need to grab a bottle of bourbon to chill on toasted oak for a porter keg addition.

    Price range of $20-$40 for a bottle.

    I don't want anything super 'spicy' or otherwise herbal/harsh/sharp.

    Any suggestions?
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 83,759
    I like bullet rye, splash of water or one ice cube. Smooth, not bourbon, but whiskey.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 83,759
    Woodford reserve double oaked. That is a bourbon and incredibly smooth.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 48,594
    C_B said:

    Woodford reserve double oaked. That is a bourbon and incredibly smooth.



    $60 bones at the store. I'll keep it in mind, but i want to try a sip before i invest a whole batch of beer.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 48,594
    C_B said:

    I like bullet rye, splash of water or one ice cube. Smooth, not bourbon, but whiskey.



    I'm not confident that i know the difference. I likr rye beers, but never had that edge in a porter/stout before.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 83,759
    Fuzzy said:

    C_B said:

    Woodford reserve double oaked. That is a bourbon and incredibly smooth.



    $60 bones at the store. I'll keep it in mind, but i want to try a sip before i invest a whole batch of beer.


    Yeah I thought it was cheaper than that.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 48,594
    C_B said:

    Fuzzy said:

    C_B said:

    Woodford reserve double oaked. That is a bourbon and incredibly smooth.



    $60 bones at the store. I'll keep it in mind, but i want to try a sip before i invest a whole batch of beer.


    Yeah I thought it was cheaper than that.


    there seems to be no rhyme or reason for the booze prices from store to store here.

    I've seen makers mark (what i used for my last two bourbon porters) range from $24-$38 for the regular 'normal' sized bottle.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 83,759
    C_B said:

    Woodford reserve double oaked. That is a bourbon and incredibly smooth.



    Got another bottle of this.

    It's really good.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • jlwjlw
    Posts: 16,454
    Bourbon is really subjective to personal preferences. Ryes will have a little more bite or spice. Wheated bourbons will typically be smoother and a little sweeter. I generally like the smoother bourbons so lean toward the wheated varieties. Cost is going to be driven by region and what's available to you. Weller as example I can;t find here locally and if I did it would be $100 for bottle. But TX, you might be able to find it for cheap. Jefferson makes really good entry level bourbons, I like Eagle Rare and Buffalo Trace for a good starting point. To get started, I'd pick an inexpensive rye and an inexpensive wheated and figure out which family you like best and then start trying a few different things. I'm lucky, my BIL is obsessed with bourbon right now so he brings stuff to try all the time.

    C_BThym
  • J_ReeJ_Ree
    Posts: 83,797
    Old crow
    "I don't have TP, but I do have ammo."
    -Some guy in Ohio
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 48,594
    J_Ree said:

    Old crow



    Done and done.
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 48,594
    jlw said:

    . To get started, I'd pick an inexpensive rye and an inexpensive wheated and figure out which family you like best and then start trying a few different things. I'm lucky, my BIL is obsessed with bourbon right now so he brings stuff to try all the time.



    I'm not trying to start a new hobby, especially a $100 a bottle hobby.

    I rapid aged some gentleman jack on some home toasted oak chunks. It no longer tastes like butt, so that's nice.

    Thym
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 52,846
    J_Ree said:

    Old crow



    Better known as old stump blower
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 52,846
    One of my uncles taught me an easy way to transform shit Bourbon into something drinkable.
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 52,846
    Open up the bottle, and pour in about a teaspoon of dry sherry. Give it a good shake, and let it sit for a couple of weeks. He said a chemical reaction really smooths it out, so it isn't like drinking 5 yards of barbed wire any more. Hard to tell from high-end Bourbon.
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 114,718
    ceannt said:

    Open up the bottle, and pour in about a teaspoon of dry sherry. Give it a good shake, and let it sit for a couple of weeks. He said a chemical reaction really smooths it out, so it isn't like drinking 5 yards of barbed wire any more. Hard to tell from high-end Bourbon.



    I’d be willing to try it with someone else’s booze.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 48,594
    Thym said:

    ceannt said:

    Open up the bottle, and pour in about a teaspoon of dry sherry. Give it a good shake, and let it sit for a couple of weeks. He said a chemical reaction really smooths it out, so it isn't like drinking 5 yards of barbed wire any more. Hard to tell from high-end Bourbon.



    I’d be willing to try it with someone else’s booze.

    i think sherry stopped existing some time in the late 80s.

    C_B
    The pinnacle of lame and awesome in one singular moment. -Lake
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 83,759
    Fuzzy said:

    Thym said:

    ceannt said:

    Open up the bottle, and pour in about a teaspoon of dry sherry. Give it a good shake, and let it sit for a couple of weeks. He said a chemical reaction really smooths it out, so it isn't like drinking 5 yards of barbed wire any more. Hard to tell from high-end Bourbon.



    I’d be willing to try it with someone else’s booze.

    i think sherry stopped existing some time in the late 80s.


    Probably why it's only available dried.

    CurlyFat
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants