using dry yeast.
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 47,189
    Dry yeasts can be a great and less expensive alternative to liquid strains. They don't require a starter and they remain viable much longer than the liquid yeasts.

    There are, however a few things that you must consider when using dry yeast packets.

    1-the viability of that dusty old packet you found in the back of your fridge.
    2-you still need to follow proper pitching rates
    3-most dry yeasts are designed to be re-hydrated before use.

    For 1 and 2, you can look here:http://www.mrmalty.com/calc/calc.html

    this handy calculator factors in the manufacture date of the yeast, to tell you exactly how much you'll need to use for your particular beer.

    For the third issue, lets go straight to the manufacturer for some advice:

    Rehydration And Usage Tips For Ale Yeast

    Pitching Rate: 1g/L
    Step 1.
    Sprinkle the yeast on the surface of ten (10) times its weight of clean, sterilized (boiled) tap water at 30 - 35°C (86° - 95°F)
    DO NOT STIR !!!
    Leave undisturbed for 15 minutes at 30 - 35°C (86° - 95°F)
    Foam or no foam is not an indication of vitality

    Step 2.
    After 15 minutes stir until all yeast is suspended
    Leave undisturbed for another 5 minutes.
    Adjust temperature of solution to that of the wort in 10°C (18°F) steps, by adding small amounts
    of wort at 5 minutes intervals and mixing gently (ATTEMPERATION)

    Step 3.
    After attemperation inoculate without delay.
    Aeration of wort is not necessary.


    That's directly from danstar. I'll add that i like to do this in a pint glass of microwave boiled water, that I cover with foil immediately after heating. You can keep the now steam cleaned foil over the glass with the yeast in it so that dust/dirt/nasty bugs don't fall into your yeast while it's rehydrating.

    So once you've figured out how much yeast you need, wait about 20 minutes before you plan to pitch, then rehydrate the yeast packet(s).
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    does anyone ever actually do the attemperation part? i have never done it once and have used dry yeast over 150 times without issue.
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 47,189

    does anyone ever actually do the attemperation part? i have never done it once and have used dry yeast over 150 times without issue.



    i never do. i suppose it might be a good idea to do it with lagers, but the temp difference between the wort and the yeast after it's been hydrating for a good 15 minutes shouldn't be all that much.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 50,473
    I almost always use dry yeast.... I rehydrate, but never attemperate
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • N_ClarkN_Clark
    Posts: 1,182
    I'm reviving this thread as our local home-brew store stopped carrying the liquid yeast and now has these dry yeast packets from a company called Fermentis. The website is way more technical than I want to get into but I haven't used dry yeast before. I assume the little packet is intended for your average 5 gallon home-brew batch? https://fermentis.com/tips-n-tricks/questions-and-answers/

    It says to rehydrate in 10x its weight of sterile water or wort - what the heck is 10x the weight of that packet? Why can't these companies just say rehydrate in X number of ounces/ml???

    It also says you can sprinkle directly on top of the wort in the fermenter and let it sit for 30 min, then aerate. The wort has to be above 68 degrees F.

    Side note it also says "Pitching: 50 to 80 g/hl"???? What the heck is this? I follow the Papazian method of brewing - relax, don't worry, have a home-brew.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 79,348
    I've made lots of good beer with dry yeast just tossed in top. I think most of those packets actually say 11 gallons. Rehydratate in some water or wort or chuck in top and go. Whatever.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 107,746
    I think I still have some S-04 and S-05 laying around. I recall using one packet for my ~10 gal batches. But pitching more isn't going to be a bad thing. I usually just added it as I was transferring to the fermentation tank post chiller.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • N_ClarkN_Clark
    Posts: 1,182
    Well I rehydrated it in a random cup and a half of wort. Pitched it and its bubbling this morning so we’ll see...
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 107,746
    N_Clark said:

    Well I rehydrated it in a random cup and a half of wort. Pitched it and its bubbling this morning so we’ll see...



    sounds like success
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 79,348
    N_Clark said:

    Well I rehydrated it in a random cup and a half of wort. Pitched it and its bubbling this morning so we’ll see...



    Did you add the milk?

    Jerry
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 50,473
    I almost always use dry yeast, since I started brewing before the liquid stuff was readily available.
    In my experience, best results are from rehydrating in about a half cup (I don't measure) of 75 to 80 degree water. I sanitize the cup first, and rinse it out well. I dump the packet in the water, and cover with a paper towel. After about 15 minutes, I add a tablespoon or so of wort, let it sit for another 5 minutes, and then pour into the fermenter filled with wort.
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 50,473
    dry yeast is very hardy... it has to be to survive the drying process. S-04 is almost bullet proof, and VERY vigorous.
    "They" say not to rehydrate in wort, because it might "shock" the yeast, but in my experience dry yeasts are very forgiving, and can take a lot of abuse. I rehydrate, mostly out of habit, but I have found it kicks off a lot faster than just sprinkling it on top of the wort... often fermentation starts being noticeable in as little as an hour.
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 50,473
    They work best for me because I'm an "opportunistic brewer," and I rarely have the luxury of planning ahead long enough to do a starter. So far, I haven't wanted to brew anything that a dry version wasn't available for the chosen style, so I'm perfectly happy to continue using dry yeasts, and not worrying about whether a vial of unviable yeast will show up in the mail.
    Never attribute to malice, that which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
  • N_ClarkN_Clark
    Posts: 1,182
    I’m fortunate theres a local homebrew store so I can pick up stuff on pretty short notice. It just weirded me out when I sent hubby with my shopping list and he came back with the packet that he said the guy recommended. I don’t know if they stopped carrying liquid altogether or if he was just out of the strain I wanted.
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 78,567
    I find that if you give zero fucks and just get most of the pack into the carboy, it works...unless the wort is still above 140F. The same is usually true of liquid.
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 79,348
    Jerry said:

    I find that if you give zero fucks and just get most of the pack into the carboy, it works...unless the wort is still above 140F. The same is usually true of liquid.



    I think part of her concern was to NOT make prison hooch.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 78,567
    C_B said:

    Jerry said:

    I find that if you give zero fucks and just get most of the pack into the carboy, it works...unless the wort is still above 140F. The same is usually true of liquid.



    I think part of her concern was to NOT make prison hooch.


    Oh, my b