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First time home brewing supplies needed?
  • bshefvebshefve
    Posts: 3
    Hi I did a mr. Beer kit and was successful. I would like to brew more beer.

    What is everything I will need to brew my own beer if I didn't want to do another kit?
  • jeepinjeepinjeepinjeepin
    Posts: 16,078
    I would suggest another kit, but not so simple as a Mr Beer. You can really get a feel for the process and make good beer with extract, steeping grains, hops, and a quality yeast. Want to hear more?
    Sign here______________________________
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    Hops. Yeast. malt. water.
    and then some more hops.

    Look around in the recipe section and you will see lots of recipes for all different types of beer you may want to brew.
    http://homebrewforums.net/categories/recipes

  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,151
    A "kit" like this from AHS is a great place to start from a recipe and process instruction standpoint.
    As far as equipment goes here is a minimum starting list...
    Pot big enough to comfortably boil 3 gallons
    Ale Pail
    Airlock
    Siphon (racking cane is a plus, autosiphon is a plus plus for beginners)
    Bottling bucket (not REALLY a requirement but makes it a lot easier for beginners)
    Bottle filling attachment thingy
    Bottle capper
    Sanitizer - StarSan or Iodophor (One-Step or whatever it is isn't really a sanitizer I don't think)
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,151
    I did a lot of AHS kits and was very happy with the results.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 99,199
    I think CB laid it out pretty good. Any kit with steeping grains and fresh ingredients will be a win. I never used a bottleing bucket myself, but you can buy a supply kit with the buckets and other basics ro get going pretty cheap. A big pot for the boil is usually the more expensive item, but you can get an inexpensive one at a place like smart and final. 60 minutes in aluminum wont hurt anything, but the cheap aluminum kettle wont last too long
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,151
    One of the first things I did was google how to siphon. Really. I had a piece of hose and a racking cane and apparently forgot how to think. There are several similar things that tend to get over thought. That's why I recommend spending the extra $10 on an autosiphon and whatever on a bottling bucket. Sure, the autosiphon will break on you in a year or so but by then you will be WAY more comfortable with all the other pieces of the process that siphoning won't seem like such an epic undertaking.

    CurlyFat
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 99,199
    nothing better than becoming brew day retarded. It happens to everyone.

    C_B
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 70,461
    I started in a very confusing way doing all grain with no equipment that I didn't already have around. It didn't go so well, so don't do what Donny Don't does, but my advice:
    Get some vinyl hose from home depot
    Get a car boy (or a bunch of 1gal wine jugs if you can get them for free) or a food grade bucket (don't spend extra for it to say ale on the side)
    Air lock(s) and bung(s) for fermentation vessel
    A funnel, maybe you already have one
    A brush to clean the inside of the carboy
    Sanstar
    And ingredients
    I'd suggest you go with a split boil with the largest pans you already own for now. Brewing is the best way to see what you'll want to invest in next.
    In bacteria there is wisdom.
    In beer there is water.
    In freedom there is wine.
  • jeepinjeepinjeepinjeepin
    Posts: 16,078
    If I had to do it over, I'd skip the buckets and go straight to Better Bottles. Only buy one 6 gallon and then wait for them to go on sale before you think about expanding.
    Sign here______________________________
  • bshefvebshefve
    Posts: 3
    This site is incredible! I am definitely going to invest in a pot and auto siphon. Wheni start buying the materials I will ask for suggestions. What about a bucket to let the beer sit in? How big does that need to be? And does it need a bubbler or pressure relief? Also I have seen test for Gravity measurements?
  • bshefvebshefve
    Posts: 3
    Also what website do you suggest to look for supplies like a bucket, airlock and bung
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 99,199
    bshefve said:

    This site is incredible! I am definitely going to invest in a pot and auto siphon. Wheni start buying the materials I will ask for suggestions. What about a bucket to let the beer sit in? How big does that need to be? And does it need a bubbler or pressure relief? Also I have seen test for Gravity measurements?



    The fermentation bucket should be like an oversized 5 gal bucket, they are actually 6.5 gal i think. It's shaped like a 5gal bucket with and eaxtra few inches at the top. The lid should have a hole in it, a bung hole. You can start by getting a bung that is sized for the hole and has a little hole for an airlock. Getting a beer fermentation kit would get you started in this regard, sincr it comes with the bucket, the airlock and properly sized bung. If you have a food supply shop around you could piece it together for a bit less, but you'll be drilling and sizing your own bung among othere things.

    For gravity measurements, get a drop in hydrometer. Its easiest to use. Eventually you may want a refractometer, because its quicker and doesnt require a large sample, but most people have trouble reading them accurately and even a small misread with throw everything off.

    For supplies, my recommendation is to skip the web for the first buy. Find a local supply shop if you can, being able to ask questions real-time while looking at products is really valuable. If you dont have a shop local or youd like to potentially save a few bucks, try

    http://www.austinhomebrew.com/
    http://www.morebeer.com/
    http://www.midwestsupplies.com/


    If you have time you could shop around. Go to a local shop, figure out exactly what you want/need make a list. Then check the sites for pricing.

    Let us know what you end up with, id like to hear what you decide.

    Btw here is the type of kit i recommend. Its 75 bucks and has everything you need from sanitizer to bottle capper.

    http://www.morebeer.com/products/personal-home-brewery-kit-1-standard.html

    CurlyFat
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • CurlyFatCurlyFat
    Posts: 56,723

    I started in a very confusing way doing all grain with no equipment that I didn't already have around. It didn't go so well, so don't do what Donny Don't does, but my advice:
    Get some vinyl hose from home depot
    Get a car boy (or a bunch of 1gal wine jugs if you can get them for free) or a food grade bucket (don't spend extra for it to say ale on the side)
    Air lock(s) and bung(s) for fermentation vessel
    A funnel, maybe you already have one
    A brush to clean the inside of the carboy
    Sanstar
    And ingredients
    I'd suggest you go with a split boil with the largest pans you already own for now. Brewing is the best way to see what you'll want to invest in next.



    So...uh...Jerryrigger lives up to his name. Just so you know.

    "At least it's not Wyoming"
    - Popeye 1953

  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,151
    Hydrometer, I can't believe I didn't add hydrometer to my first list.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 99,199
    C_B said:

    Hydrometer, I can't believe I didn't add hydrometer to my first list.



    aint nobody got time for that.

    but seriously, it's not necessary to make a good batch of beer, especially if you're starting from a kit. It's important if you want to keep good records and have a good understanding of the ABV of the finished product. Otherwise it's just 15 bucks more toward that first batch of beer.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,151
    Lakewood said:

    C_B said:

    Hydrometer, I can't believe I didn't add hydrometer to my first list.



    aint nobody got time for that.

    but seriously, it's not necessary to make a good batch of beer, especially if you're starting from a kit. It's important if you want to keep good records and have a good understanding of the ABV of the finished product. Otherwise it's just 15 bucks more toward that first batch of beer.


    Agreed. It's also a good idea for a new brewer to use it to make sure the final gravity has been reached and is stable before bottling. Most people around here leave their beer in primary way longer than this takes however....
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 70,461
    C_B said:

    Hydrometer, I can't believe I didn't add hydrometer to my first list.


    So I used a Bic pen with some lines drawn on it for a while and it worked well. I put some #8 bird shot and some hot glue in the bottom so only a little bit stuck out when floating in distilled water.
    But don't do want Donny don't does! Buy a hydrometer. Don't trust these fools (well actually they are rather trustworthy), but a hydrometer is the most important thing when starting out. Taste things every time you take a reading. Soon you won't need it much, but it's one of my favorite tools. I have two and some other scales.
    IMAG1044.jpg
    1520 x 2688 - 2M
    In bacteria there is wisdom.
    In beer there is water.
    In freedom there is wine.
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 70,461
    C_B said:

    Lakewood said:

    C_B said:

    Hydrometer, I can't believe I didn't add hydrometer to my first list.



    aint nobody got time for that.

    but seriously, it's not necessary to make a good batch of beer, especially if you're starting from a kit. It's important if you want to keep good records and have a good understanding of the ABV of the finished product. Otherwise it's just 15 bucks more toward that first batch of beer.


    Agreed. It's also a good idea for a new brewer to use it to make sure the final gravity has been reached and is stable before bottling. Most people around here leave their beer in primary way longer than this takes however....


    Shut up, I'm just aging it so it's better. It's just been 27 months and has some slime growing on it.
    In bacteria there is wisdom.
    In beer there is water.
    In freedom there is wine.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 46,182
    Probably even more important than a hydrometer, is a good thermometer. The "dial" types are pretty accurate, and not that expensive.
    Even if you are only doing all extract batches they are handy to determine if you have chilled your wort enough. For steeping grains, partial mashes, and all grain, they are a necessity.
    In wine there is wisdom.
    In beer there is freedom.
    In water there is bacteria.
  • ceanntceannt
    Posts: 46,182
    Equipment is very much a matter of personal preference. You can go as simple, and low tech as I do... or you can spend a ton of money on fancy pants, high tech brewing systems. Sure, the fancy stuff is cool as shucks, but won't produce any better beer because of it. My advice is to start simple, learn the basics, gain some experience, and take it from there.
    In wine there is wisdom.
    In beer there is freedom.
    In water there is bacteria.
  • jeepinjeepinjeepinjeepin
    Posts: 16,078
    I saw that Northern Brewer has a deal. Buy a kit and a Big Mouth Bubbler and get a second one free.
    Sign here______________________________
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 70,461
    Also, remember; if you can buy a brewing thing that isn't sold as a brewing thing it will be about half the price
    In bacteria there is wisdom.
    In beer there is water.
    In freedom there is wine.
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 70,461
    And consider using old 1/2 barrel kegs. One with the top cut off makes a great kettle.
    In bacteria there is wisdom.
    In beer there is water.
    In freedom there is wine.
  • jeepinjeepinjeepinjeepin
    Posts: 16,078

    Also, remember; if you can buy a brewing thing that isn't sold as a brewing thing it will be about half the price



    People always mention confectionary buckets, whether they held flour, sugar, syrup, or icing.
    Sign here______________________________
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 70,461

    Also, remember; if you can buy a brewing thing that isn't sold as a brewing thing it will be about half the price



    People always mention confectionary buckets, whether they held flour, sugar, syrup, or icing.


    Yeah, if anyone wants some 5gal buckets, I have some you can have in western Massachusetts.
    In bacteria there is wisdom.
    In beer there is water.
    In freedom there is wine.