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Bottle vs Can
  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,494
    The conversation through college (and with anyone that likes BMC and nothing else) is bottled beer tastes better right? Even Busch Light, you get that in a bottle and somehow it's a step up from the can. You can tell with the first taste.
    I too was once of this mid set, when splurging on beer meant I got Bud heavy.

    Now that more and more craft breweries are coming online we're seeing a much wider distribution of canned craft beer than every before. I have had a fair amount, but tonight was the first time I've had an "old trusty" in a can.

    Sierra Nevada Pale Ale.

    Maybe it's the bourbon that has numbed my taste buds, but this tastes more bland than I think it should. Is it possible that packaging can affect palatability enough to notice? I believe I'll need to get some bottles and have a side by side tasting.

    Please discuss.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 100,775
    i believe the larger surface area on the top of the beer while packaging results in a higher quantity of oxygen in the packaged product and thus more oxidation of the beer and also i believe that since it's not packaged under pressure that you end up with a flatter beer.

    of course that's based on only having seen a few canning operations. there may well be some high tech canning systems that do a pressurized fill.... but i dont know of any.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • CurlyFatCurlyFat
    Posts: 58,806
    I can't tell a difference when it's poured into a glass. I had my wife do it for me as a blind test once with fat tire.

    "Balls."
    - Thym's 100,000th post

  • C_BC_B
    Posts: 76,494
    DrCurly said:

    I can't tell a difference when it's poured into a glass. I had my wife do it for me as a blind test once with fat tire.



    Oh, good call.
    "On it. I hate software." ~Cpt Snarklepants
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 72,182
    Lakewood said:

    i believe the larger surface area on the top of the beer while packaging results in a higher quantity of oxygen in the packaged product and thus more oxidation of the beer and also i believe that since it's not packaged under pressure that you end up with a flatter beer.

    of course that's based on only having seen a few canning operations. there may well be some high tech canning systems that do a pressurized fill.... but i dont know of any.



    During the filling the beer is spewing out lots of co2 which is slightly heavier than air. So as long as the lid is at least rested on top of the can quickly there should be almost no oxygen sealed in, though slightly more than with bottles...
    But bottle caps seal with a semi permeable plastic gasket, so I doubt that there is much difference in the oxygen question.
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 72,182
    DrCurly said:

    I can't tell a difference when it's poured into a glass. I had my wife do it for me as a blind test once with fat tire.



    Science FTW!
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 72,182
    Bottles have the clear disadvantage of letting some light in and also having plastics contact the fluid at least a little of the time in transit.

    I choose cans if all else is equal because they cost less to produce, and if more people buy them prices might go down.

    BenS
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 100,775
    DrCurly said:

    I can't tell a difference when it's poured into a glass. I had my wife do it for me as a blind test once with fat tire.



    I should try this
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • BenSBenS
    Posts: 6,248
    My kegs are a can right? I pick cans.
    There's no starting point. It's just a massive sea of shit to wade through until you find the occasional corn kernel. -DrCurly
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 100,775
    BenS said:

    My kegs are a can right? I pick cans.



    Your kegs are stainless steel and purged of air.

    The CO2 blanket concept is false, since simple dissolution causes the air to mix with the co2 in the can. And as far as plastics go, most companies use lined cans because aluminum dissolves into acidic solutions easily and leaves beer tasting like you're licking metal shavings. The lining material is a form of plastic. So there's arguably far more plastic in contact with the beer in a lined can than in bottle with a lined cap.
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • frydogbrewsfrydogbrews
    Posts: 44,679
    I think the myth came from truth. Decades ago, when @ceannt was a young man, canned beer did not taste as good as bottles.
    Nowadays, that whole thing is false.
    I have had many delicious canned beers (Hop Drop N Roll umps to mind).
    Modern canning operations as well as can linings have created beer that equals and is sometimes superior(due to light penetration) of bottled beer.

    The added benefit is a simple resource one. Can are so much lighter to move around the country than glass! If i have the option to buy delicious hoppy beer in a can i will always take it. I am also more apt to try an unknown beer if it is in a can, simply as a way of rewarding the brewery for choosing that option.
    If you would like to try some amazing canned craft beer, go visit @jeepinjeepin in NC. I had nearly a dozen canned bits of heaven over there.

    jeepinjeepin
  • jeepinjeepinjeepinjeepin
    Posts: 16,488
    More and more of our local liquid heaven dispensaries are investing in Crowler machines too.
    Sign here______________________________
  • BenSBenS
    Posts: 6,248

    More and more of our local liquid heaven dispensaries are investing in Crowler machines too.



    I love those goddamn things. Oskar blues in Brevard has one and they are amazing. I want to buy one so much. (The machine.)
    There's no starting point. It's just a massive sea of shit to wade through until you find the occasional corn kernel. -DrCurly
  • BenSBenS
    Posts: 6,248
    Lakewood said:

    BenS said:

    My kegs are a can right? I pick cans.



    Your kegs are stainless steel and purged of air.

    The CO2 blanket concept is false, since simple dissolution causes the air to mix with the co2 in the can. And as far as plastics go, most companies use lined cans because aluminum dissolves into acidic solutions easily and leaves beer tasting like you're licking metal shavings. The lining material is a form of plastic. So there's arguably far more plastic in contact with the beer in a lined can than in bottle with a lined cap.


    Were the kegs that you had go sour purged of air? There is no such thing as a CO2 blanket. It's true. However, CO2 can be trapped in a matrix. (foam) All canning machines operate under the specification that they cap on foam. Same as bottling machines. Cans, including MY kegs, FTW.
    There's no starting point. It's just a massive sea of shit to wade through until you find the occasional corn kernel. -DrCurly
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 100,775
    Nice.yes I always purge with CO2, but that has little impact on a mold infection... Not souring BTW
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 72,182
    C_B said:

    The conversation through college (and with anyone that likes BMC and nothing else) is bottled beer tastes better right?


    I learned and then unlearned that this
    image

    is better than this
    image
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 46,034
    Lakewood said:

    And as far as plastics go, most companies use lined cans because aluminum dissolves into acidic solutions easily and leaves beer tasting like you're licking metal shavings.



    I've had canned beer that tasted like this. Not a fan.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 100,775

    Lakewood said:

    And as far as plastics go, most companies use lined cans because aluminum dissolves into acidic solutions easily and leaves beer tasting like you're licking metal shavings.



    I've had canned beer that tasted like this. Not a fan.


    Yeah, it's not exactly a desirable flavor
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 72,182
    Lakewood said:

    Lakewood said:

    And as far as plastics go, most companies use lined cans because aluminum dissolves into acidic solutions easily and leaves beer tasting like you're licking metal shavings.



    I've had canned beer that tasted like this. Not a fan.


    Yeah, it's not exactly a desirable flavor


    It really depends upon what you're drinking. It makes golden anniversary more drinkable.