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Two Day Brewing
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 45,611
    So, it's winter and crappy outside. Makes me not want to brew, since I have to either use my stove-top or brave the crappy outside weather. Especially on the weekends, since nothing ever seems to get done during the week.

    So I was thinkin of trying to sneak in a couple brews during the week, that way the weekends are free for all the various things that take up all my free time.

    Well, weekday brewing takes long enough when the weather is nice and I can do it outside on my deck, but in the winter months, it take so much longer. Since I don't really feel like staying up that late, I was planning on splitting the all grain brews into two days.

    I know that there are folks out there in internetbrewingland that wrap the mash tun up and mash overnight, but that still leaves the bulk of the brewing for one day. No thanks. Not to mention our friend lacto. I'll invite him to the party if my cousin wheat shows up, but otherwise, he's a jerk.

    So my plan is to mash and sparge normally, but collect all the runnings in spare buckets and leave it outside until I'm ready for the boil. The chilly Illinois winter will take it down out both enzyme and lacto range, so no real need for mashout.

    I'll probably also go with a no chill for most of the beers ( i like malty :-* ), so that'll cut down on the second day as well.

    If I can find and implement enough motivation to keep this up once a week, I should be able to stock up on brews enough to last me through spring and hopefully get a few high gravity/long aging beers for fall.

    That's the plan anyway. Anyone care to add some tips or ideas? Anything that might cut down on the timing or make it a little easier is more than welcome.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 70,648
    Or just don't sleep one night.
    In bacteria there is wisdom.
    In beer there is water.
    In freedom there is wine.
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 45,611

    Or just don't sleep one night.



    that is the opposite of what i want to do.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • BenvarineBenvarine
    Posts: 1,606
    Sounds like a plan. Worth a shot. Infection is always an issue, but you are going to boil so maybe it will work out. Maybe not gold medal winning beer, but hopefully still quality stuff and very efficient use of time. I've measured water, ground grain and weighed all hops and set up brew rig the day before, makes brew day a bit faster. I always have trouble getting started on brew day.
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 45,611
    Benvarine said:

    Sounds like a plan. Worth a shot. Infection is always an issue, but you are going to boil so maybe it will work out. Maybe not gold medal winning beer, but hopefully still quality stuff and very efficient use of time. I've measured water, ground grain and weighed all hops and set up brew rig the day before, makes brew day a bit faster. I always have trouble getting started on brew day.



    infection isn't an issue at the temps it is outside right now.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 70,648

    Benvarine said:

    Sounds like a plan. Worth a shot. Infection is always an issue, but you are going to boil so maybe it will work out. Maybe not gold medal winning beer, but hopefully still quality stuff and very efficient use of time. I've measured water, ground grain and weighed all hops and set up brew rig the day before, makes brew day a bit faster. I always have trouble getting started on brew day.



    infection isn't an issue at the temps it is outside right now.


    Once it cools down to that temp. T(t)= t(s)-(t(o)-t(s))e^(-kt)
    In bacteria there is wisdom.
    In beer there is water.
    In freedom there is wine.
  • JerryJerry
    Posts: 70,648
    What is your k value? Think about it. Maybe some half measure cooling would be good, as it'll take some time to get below the danger zone. May even want to shoot for a colder night that average.
    In bacteria there is wisdom.
    In beer there is water.
    In freedom there is wine.
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 45,611

    What is your k value? Think about it. Maybe some half measure cooling would be good, as it'll take some time to get below the danger zone. May even want to shoot for a colder night that average.



    To go from 150 to 32? It's not long enough for me to worry much about it, maybe 4-5 hours. Considering it takes a good 30+ hours at 65F and above to really sour wort enough to make noticeable contribution, I'm not going to bother pre-cooling.

    For clarification, I'm not planning on brewing any light lagers, blondes, etc using this two part brewing. It's likely to be stout, porter, etc. so there should be big robust flavors to mask any kind of souring that might happen.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B
  • ThymThym
    Posts: 99,286
    And......
    The only thing between me and a train wreck is blind luck..... - Kenny
  • FuzzyFuzzy
    Posts: 45,611
    been workin late every day. haven't had the time for even a half a brewday.
    "Oh, you were serious? I was drunk."-C_B